Articles by admin

You are currently browsing admin’s articles.

This is a single month of a large collection of letters from Lotte, who lived in northern Germany, to her boyfriend Ernst, who served on the SMS Gneisenau before WWI (though these letters start after that ship had already been sunk). For details and links to other months in this collection, visit the index page for this collection. This month includes 7 letters in 21 images. 

November 3, 1915

November 10, 1915

November 14, 1915

November 17, 1915

November 21, 1915

November 24, 1915

November 28, 1915

This is a single month of a large collection of letters from Lotte, who lived in northern Germany, to her boyfriend Ernst, who served on the SMS Gneisenau before WWI (though these letters start after that ship had already been sunk). For details and links to other months in this collection, visit the index page for this collection. This month includes 10 letters in 20 images. 

October 6, 1915

October 10, 1915

October 13, 1915

October 14, 1915

October 17, 1915

October 20, 1915

October 24, 1915

October 26, 1915

October 28, 1915

October 31, 1915

This is a single month of a large collection of letters from Lotte, who lived in northern Germany, to her boyfriend Ernst, who served on the SMS Gneisenau before WWI (though these letters start after that ship had already been sunk). For details and links to other months in this collection, visit the index page for this collection. This month includes 12 letters in 24 images. 

September 2, 1915

September 5, 1915

September 6, 1915

September 9, 1915

September 12, 1915

September 15, 1915

September 18, 1915

September 20, 1915

September 23, 1915

September 26, 1915

September 29, 1915

September 30, 1915

This is a single month of a large collection of letters from Lotte, who lived in northern Germany, to her boyfriend Ernst, who served on the SMS Gneisenau before WWI (though these letters start after that ship had already been sunk). For details and links to other months in this collection, visit the index page for this collection. This month includes 13 letters in 30 images. 

August 1, 1915

August 4, 1915

August 5, 1915

August 8, 1915

August 11, 1915

August 15, 1915

August 18, 1915

August 21, 1915

August 22, 1915

August 25, 1915

August 28, 1915

August 29, 1915, Letter 1

August 29, 1915, Letter 2

I built this banquette over the weekend, posted it on Facebook, and now I have a few people asking for plans. While I don’t have any plans specifically, I did take a lot of pictures along the way to show how it was build. I hope this is helpful!

For supplies I used:

  • Kreg Pocket Hole jig with 2.5-in screws
  • 8 96″ 2×4 Whitewood Stud
  • 24′ 1×4 Primed Pine (for top/bottom molding)
  • 30″ Nickel Piano Hinge
  • 48″ Nickel Piano Hinge
  • 40′ 15/16-in White Batten (for panel molding)
  • 5mm (1/4″) Utility Panel (face)
  • 23/32 (3/4″) A/C Arauco Radiata Plywood
  • 1 Qt eggshell paint color matched to cabinets
  • 3/8″ flathead hardwood plugs
  • About 20 2″ screws

Supplies were about $200 total, but because you don’t use a whole box of screws or sheet of plywood, the actual expense was about $140 of that.

I started by framing the bench with 2x4s. I ripped one to 2×2, but that was a mistake. Instead orient this 2×4 the way you see it here on the other bench. This provides support for both sides of the hinged plywood. The benches are designed to put you at about 18″ off the ground with sitting on a cushion, assuming a 2-inch cushion that compresses to about an inch. The wooden frames are 16″ high, and come out about 20″ from the wall to provide space for pillows at the back.

I got a sheet of 3/4″ AC plywood (pretty clean on one side) and 1/4″ primed plywood for the sides. Most home centers will cut these for you to size.

I cut the 1/4 plywood to size for the side panels and taped them in place until I got them all fitting properly.

I cut the lids to size also, before ripping them for the hinges. I usually dry fit everything before I fasten them.

I spaced out the lids with sheets of cardboard.

I ripped the back edges of the lids to place the hinges. In this picture you can see that I repaired the mistake I noted above (with the 2×2 instead of the 2×4).

Installed all the hinges (cut to size with a hack saw) with just a few screws each in case I needed to readjust them.

I used 1×4 primed pine for the trim, working my way around and mitering the outside corners — starting on the bottom. I attached them with a nail gun, and used pieces of card stock to lift them a hair off the ground. (I wanted to make it easier to protect the floor from paint.)

On the top, I wanted to leave a little lip to contain the cushions and help keep them from sliding off the lids. The boards extend about 3/4″ from the top of the lid. At this point, I had to keep one lid open all the time or I’d probably have to use a vacuum to get it back open, so I attached a piece of string stapled to the bottom of one of the lids.

I also made a trim piece to cover the outside corners, and you can see that I did a test fit of the decorative molding, which is just taped into place.

I cut the cut the batten to size carefully so they were all the same size.

I glued them on and held them in place with tape while the glue dried.

I drilled 1-inch holes for finger pulls.

The top trim board is likely going to see a lot of weight, so I reinforced those with some inset 2-inch screws, filling the holes with glued plugs, and then later flush cutting them with a Japanese saw.

Next came the paint, which I had matches to our new cabinets. I started by sliding some card stock under the bottom molding to protect the floor.

Here’s the finished banquette. Next we need to make some cushions!

Technical Information

Files are resized with imagemagick, using: magick convert *.jpg[1000x1000] -interlace line -quality 85 -gravity SouthEast -font Arial -pointsize 14 -fill black -annotate +2+2 "(c)2019 theFrankes.com" -fill white -annotate +3+3 "(c)2019 theFrankes.com" BanquetteZ%03d.jpg

Nanning, China

So our second bag is still missing–they think it might still be in Los Angeles.  We had a pretty busy day. We starting with a walk in the area of the hotel, and ran across a bustling market that had just about every kind of food you could imagine… You could pick a chicken from a cage and they’d basically cut it up for you. There were tons of fruits and vegetables–some huge, like nothing I’ve ever seen. We even walked by a bucket of turtles. It was a real eye-opening experience.

We spent the day at Quingxiu Mountain–a pretty large park that appeared to be right in the middle of the city. (I say appeared to be because you could see high-rises for miles in every direction, and even poking out from behind the mountain. It was pretty hot and humid today, but well worth the trip–the place is beautiful. We started with a very old tree and ended up at this huge obstacle course playground that the kids just loved. Dinner in town was good, but still not as good as our first lunch in China.

It’s a bit odd that strangers sometimes want to take pictures with us, and we catch them staring from time to time as well. The style here is very western, though–very much like back home. France was more different that China appears to be, apart from maybe the hats and driving ponchos.

We had another walk around the hotel area this evening and ended up meandering into a music store where a few people were playing this recorder-like instrument. They brought out some chairs, sat us down, and basically played a set… pretty darn cool… The kids are really having an eye-opening experience here, and I think losing the bag was a good lesson for them, too.

 

Well it’s been an adventure alright! We had two unexpected overnights–one in LAX and one in Beijing–due to a ten hour delay in the intentional flight. But we made it! Unfortunately our luggage did not. One of the two bags arrived last night (the one with the allergy safe food for the girl) and the one with most of our clothes is still missing. :/

This place is pretty amazing so far though. The cities just go on forever. Our first meal here was absolutely delicious–beef with chili sauce, beans, and kind of egg/tomato dish, and more, all family style. Then we went of to this crazy water-park-like hot spring with 150+ springs ranging from cold to hot, and grape flavored to tea. Then there was the one where fish were nibbling on our feet.

The rest of the family is doing well so far… still a bit jet-lagged and getting up real early. Big day planned today. Hopefully I can post more later!

Get comfortable using basic tools

  • Safety first. Each disassembly should be supervised. There are sharp and springy parts, so take proper safety precautions. Adults should NOT let the kids make safety mistakes.
  • Always use the proper tool. For example, don’t try to use a flat-head screwdriver to loosen a Phillips head screw. Use the right size screwdriver tip.
  • Use the tool properly. For example, hold screwdrivers straight so screws don’t get stripped.

Solve disassembly problems

  • Disassemble — don’t break, deform, tear, or cut. Wires, for example, usually don’t need to be cut because they’re often attached to connectors.
  • Take time to infer how parts are assembled — don’t rush disassembly, and in most cases, you shouldn’t need to force anything.
  • Printers can be MESSY! There’s usually a giant ink-filled sponge in them. Use gloves and paper towels to remove this.
    Identify parts that could cause problems before you work on them. (e.g. sharp parts, messy parts, etc.)

Explore how the machines work

  • Again, don’t rush it.
  • For every component you see, try to figure out what it might be for. (This includes circuit boards.) Manufacturers don’t add stuff that’s not required, so there’s usually a reason for everything.
  • Identify subassemblies. One machine will usually disassemble into several subassemblies, each with a particular purpose.

[sc:3dclub-intro]

Here’s a quick update on some of the projects we’ve been working on this year:

We went to the 2014 USA Science and Engineering Festival up in Washington, DC, and we wanted to share it with our fellow school Maker Team members. Here’s the video we produced to do that.

USA Science & Engineering Festival
Washington, DC
April 24-27, 2014
http://www.usasciencefestival.org/

SPECIAL THANKS to: Lockheed Martin, Snap-On, K’Nex, Lulzbot, U.S. Naval Academy, Natasha, NASA, and Printrbot.

MUSIC: “Saturdays Basement” by cdk, 2014 – Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) http://ccmixter.org/files/cdk/45072

There are live links on the youtube page for the video for each of these segments:

0:09 Introduction
0:33 Scenes from the Festival
0:53 Lots of 3D Printers!
1:05 Lockheed Martin Large Robot Arm 3D Printer
1:52 Lockheed Martin F35 Lightening II Cockpit Simulator
2:23 Snap-on Racecar
2:33 Huge K’Nex Ferris Wheel
3:14 Lulzbot 3D Printing
3:50 U.S. Naval Academy Robotic Arm
4:52 Natasha the Maker
5:23 NASA Astronaut Alvin Drew
5:57 Brook at Printrbot
6:43 Summary with More Scenes from Exhibits

« Older entries § Newer entries »