Sanguinololu

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Special Content: Repraps for Education

This is part of a series of posts about starting and facilitating a project-based 3D printer club at a local elementary school, with the ultimate goal of replicating the program at schools everywhere. We'll be posting as many details as possible, including lesson plans and supporting materials. For more information about the entire project, including a listing of posts related to it, please visit the 3D Printer Club for Schools project page. 

This is an SVG file of a Sanguinololu electronics circuit board for 3D printers, and it will likely be helpful if you’re  trying to layout a mounting board for your electronics that includes the Sanguinololu and other components. The drawing includes extra space required by connectors or wires that are plugged into it, and the holes have cross-hairs so you can tape it onto a board and easily drill it. (Right-click and Save As to download the SVG. In you need an SVG editor, check out Inkscape—it’s fantastic and free.)

Sanguinololu-Footprint

Note that there’s extra space for the USB cable because it tends to be a beefier cable.

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When I wired up my Reprap and started printing, I noticed that all my prints were mirrored along the Y axis — I’d set it up with the end stop at the front and configured it so that the print bed moved forward when I clicked Y- in pronterface (printrun), and not back. (When the table moves back, the print head essentially moves forward along it.)

The end stops were already in place and I didn’t want to move them, but no combination of INVERT_Y_DIR and Y_HOME_DIR in Configuration.h would work. I even tried changing Y_ENDSTOP_INVERT, knowing full well that it wouldn’t help either.

So how do you flip an axis without moving the end stop or the home position? The answer is to change both INVERT_Y_DIR and Y_HOME_DIR in Configuration.h, and also swap the values for Y_MAX_PIN and  Y_MIN_PIN in pins.h for the specific motherboard you’re using.

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A couple of people have noticed this, so I thought I’d write it up. There’s nothing wrong — it’s just something to be aware of if you’re soldering up a Sanguinololu 1.3a PCB.

If you look closely at the circuit board where the FTDI chip goes, you’ll notice a tiny solder bridge between pins 25 and 26 (below the “L” in “FT232RL”). I noticed it when I first inspected the board, and I looked at the original gerber files to make sure it was part of the design. It is, in fact, part of the original design (see photo below), so there’s no need to try to remove it. (To confuse the issue, the instructions even say to look for things like this.)

If you did remove it, that’s okay, too — those pins (which both go to ground) are still connected inside of the outline of the chip.

One other thing to note is that the pin headers along the top of the board sit a little further in than those along the other sides. This is also exactly as it is in the original gerber files, but it means that the PCB might prevent some right-angle headers (like those in the Mouser project kit) from plugging all the way in unless the male headers are soldered a little high. (See the second photo.) This is probably more of an aesthetic issue than a functional one, but if you want to make sure they plug in completely, you can use one of the female connectors to space it properly when you solder it on.

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Yeah, free. If you’re starting a 3D printer project (such as RepRap) at your public K-12 school in the United States for the benefit of the students, then we’ll give you a free Sanguinololu v1.3a PCB to help you out (while supplies last). They typically sell for about $12-14. We won’t even charge you for shipping.

What is a 3D printer? Check out the video at the bottom of the page for an introduction.

Not a school but want one anyway? I’m selling some of them to raise funds for a printer for a local school. Just select “None – Buy one” for affiliation below, and I’ll send you the details. They’re $11, shipping included within the USA.

Sanguinololu 1.3a PCB

Sanguinololu 1.3a PCB

We don’t see any reason why kids shouldn’t have access 3D printing technology in their problem solving toolkit, and soldering up the electronics is all part of the fun. A club with only six kids raising $50 each could be well on its way to building and operating a 3D printer for its school, and while the electrionics can typically amount to 1/3 or more of the final build price, hopefully a free PCB will help ease the pain a bit.

Are you interested? Submit the form below for instructions on how to get your free Sanguinololu 1.3a PCB.

Name (required)
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School (required)
Affiliation (required)
Description of Your Project (required)

What is a 3D Printer?

Here’s an introduction to the technology:

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