Reprap

You are currently browsing the archive for the Reprap category.

Get comfortable using basic tools

  • Safety first. Each disassembly should be supervised. There are sharp and springy parts, so take proper safety precautions. Adults should NOT let the kids make safety mistakes.
  • Always use the proper tool. For example, don’t try to use a flat-head screwdriver to loosen a Phillips head screw. Use the right size screwdriver tip.
  • Use the tool properly. For example, hold screwdrivers straight so screws don’t get stripped.

Solve disassembly problems

  • Disassemble — don’t break, deform, tear, or cut. Wires, for example, usually don’t need to be cut because they’re often attached to connectors.
  • Take time to infer how parts are assembled — don’t rush disassembly, and in most cases, you shouldn’t need to force anything.
  • Printers can be MESSY! There’s usually a giant ink-filled sponge in them. Use gloves and paper towels to remove this.
    Identify parts that could cause problems before you work on them. (e.g. sharp parts, messy parts, etc.)

Explore how the machines work

  • Again, don’t rush it.
  • For every component you see, try to figure out what it might be for. (This includes circuit boards.) Manufacturers don’t add stuff that’s not required, so there’s usually a reason for everything.
  • Identify subassemblies. One machine will usually disassemble into several subassemblies, each with a particular purpose.

Special Content: Repraps for Education

This is part of a series of posts about starting and facilitating a project-based 3D printer club at a local elementary school, with the ultimate goal of replicating the program at schools everywhere. We'll be posting as many details as possible, including lesson plans and supporting materials. For more information about the entire project, including a listing of posts related to it, please visit the 3D Printer Club for Schools project page. 

Here’s a quick update on some of the projects we’ve been working on this year:

Here’s the complete Bill of Materials (BOM) for the club’s Prusa i2 build. It’s sorted first by type of material, then by assembly. The number at the left is the part number in the order it was recorded from a reference machine.

Direct link here.

Special Content: Repraps for Education

This is part of a series of posts about starting and facilitating a project-based 3D printer club at a local elementary school, with the ultimate goal of replicating the program at schools everywhere. We'll be posting as many details as possible, including lesson plans and supporting materials. For more information about the entire project, including a listing of posts related to it, please visit the 3D Printer Club for Schools project page. 

Here’s a certificate of achievement that you can use for the kids who complete the project at your school. We had two titles: The kids who were in the club were awarded “3D Printer Maker” certificates, and those that helped out a lot (usually younger siblings) were awarded “”3D Printer Apprentice” certificates. The text of the certificate is shown below the image.

Download the SVG file here: 3D Printer Club: Lesson Plans and Other Documents

3D Printer Club Certificate of Achievement

3D Printer Club Certificate of Achievement

The border features the typical honeycomb-style infill pattern that 3D prints often use.

Here’s the text of the certificate:

Let it be known that on this twenty-fourth day of May, two thousand and thirteen,

Student Name

is hereby honored and recognized for outstanding achievement as part of an awesome team of awesome kids who built a fully functional 3D printer—from scratch, having learned tons and tons of cool stuff along the way, including blogging, accounting, sourcing, assembly, robotics, electronics, management, teamwork, and a bunch of other awesome things too numerous to list. This exceedingly rare and highly coveted document therefore confers upon the aforementioned Maker, the esteemed, hard-earned, and frankly just awesome title of

3D Printer Maker

with all the rights, privileges, and honors appertaining thereunto.

In this video, Jacob shows an easy way to set up a PCB heatbed for your 3D printer — a method that allows the entire surface of the heatbed to be used for printing. He also shows how to cut inexpensive certificate frame glass to size with some simple tools. We’ve had printers with a heatbed setup just like this running without incident for over a year.

Supplies used: PCB Heatbed (with high-temperature wire attached), glass (same size as heatbed), scissors, kapton tape, four M3 nuts and screws (12-16mm), screwdriver & pliers, thermistor, thermistor lead insulation (kapton tape works, too), and pipe insulation tape. See below for glass cutting tools.

Glass Cutting Tools & Materials: Safety glasses, sheet glass (certificate frame glass works well), glass cleaner, paper towels, permanent marker, ruler, cutting oil, straight edge, glass cutting tool, breaking edge, leather gloves, and sandpaper.

A project-based RepRap build is the perfect way to bring STEM and many other disciplines to your school. To learn more about starting a 3D printer build at your school, visit http://www.thefrankes.com/wp/?page_id=2766.

Music

Special Content: Repraps for Education

This is part of a series of posts about starting and facilitating a project-based 3D printer club at a local elementary school, with the ultimate goal of replicating the program at schools everywhere. We'll be posting as many details as possible, including lesson plans and supporting materials. For more information about the entire project, including a listing of posts related to it, please visit the 3D Printer Club for Schools project page. 

Here’s a video to the team from software developer and RepRap expert Alessandro Ranellucci, the creator of the extremely popular Slic3r software.

Random wires are ugly, so we decided to ask for some spare spiral binding coil at the local office supply store and walked away with a handful of 6mm and 10mm coils. They make for very nice wire wrap.

Spiral Binding Coil Wire WrapSpiral Binding Coil Wire Wrap

Spiral Binding Coil Wire Wrap

We made a video to show the difference in noise between the Pololu A4988 Stepper Motor Driver Carrier, which has 1/16 steps, and the DRV8825 Stepper Motor Driver Carrier which has 1/32 steps. These drivers are common in RepRap 3D printers. The resistor soldered onto the DRV8825 is not required on their latest versions of the board.

The goal for this video was originally to capture the difference in sound that I noticed when I switched from one driver to the other, and this test seemed to do that. I updated it to be a bit more scientific than it was originally by carefully setting the current limit, adjusting the steps per unit, and including details about the setup.

For this test:

  • 12.17V DC 
  • Kysan 1124090 (1.8°, 1.5A/phase) stepper motor
  • 18T Aluminum GT2 2mm Belt/Pulley
  • PLA bushings on W1 tool steel smooth rod with white lithium grease
  • 1.3A current limit using VREF method

We met with Congressman Price and several other US representatives to promote open hardware 3D printing — and how they fit into STEM education in particular.

CongressmanPricePhoto_sm Congressman Foster

We got an older laptop to use for one of our 3D printer builds, and so we set out to set it up for 3D printing. The laptop is an IBM ThinkPad T41, and because the processor doesn’t support PAE, we weren’t able to use the latest versions or Ubuntu or Mint. Mint 13 installed okay, but the default window managers gave us some trouble, so we ended up installing Lubuntu 12.04. This version doesn’t require PAE.

After installing and updating the operating system, we set out to install pronterface (Printrun) and slic3r from the git repository. Here’s what we did:

First install python support for printrun, and git.

sudo apt-get install python-serial python-wxgtk2.8 \
 python-pyglet python-tk
sudo apt-get install git

Create a directory for RepRap stuff, and clone Printrun to it from the git repository.

mkdir RepRap
cd RepRap/
git clone https://github.com/kliment/Printrun.git

Next comes build-essential, perl, and cpanminus — all required for slic3r.

sudo apt-get install build-essential libgtk2.0-dev \
 libwxgtk2.8-dev libwx-perl libmodule-build-perl \
 libnet-dbus-perl
sudo apt-get install cpanminus

Go into the Printrun directory, get slic3r, and then dive into that directory where we’ll test it to be sure it all works.

cd Printrun/
git clone http://github.com/alexrj/Slic3r.git
cd Slic3r/

Grab the cpan modules required for slic3r, and test it to be sure it loads up properly.

sudo cpanm Boost::Geometry::Utils Math::Clipper \
 Math::ConvexHull Math::ConvexHull::MonotoneChain \
 Math::Geometry::Voronoi Math::PlanePath Moo Wx
./slic3r.pl

Step up one directory and make sure pronterface works well.

cd ..
python ./pronterface.py

« Older entries